Mentee Success Story!

Incredibly proud of my mentee Anthony. When we first started our journey together he told me that he had been written off by his school as not being suited to A-Levels and was told he should pick a manual trade and follow a less academic pathway.  This wasn’t what he wanted, so he rose above, never letting go of his dream to get a degree. He went to college and only a year behind his peers collected enough UCAS points to apply to university.
Today I am so proud that this man, who was blessed with the gift of a different learning style they broadly label ‘dyslexia’, has graduated with a 1st class honours degree in Business Management and HR!
“Take that!” the teachers that called him lazy! “Take that!” the learning support department that told his parents they would only support him if he was statemented and “Take that!” the Careers Advisor who couldn’t see past the end of her own nose! I am so pleased that Anthony had drive, a non waning ambition and strong supportive parents who wouldn’t take this nonsense, who fought for his education and provided him with the tools and encouragement he did not get at school. Anthony was lucky, there are many young men and girls out there who need this kind of support but can’t access it.
I truly believe that I am so lucky too.  I learned such a lot from Anthony and his Mum, he is a role model for me as a professional, she is a role model for me as a mother and as a person and they are the best kind of role models to my children. I will continue to support Anthony in his search for an HR role and I will be re-registering myself as a volunteer mentor for local young people. Today is a great day!  Congratulations Anthony, you more than deserve this accolade!

*If any of my HR contacts are interested in hearing more about this intelligent, talented and driven young man please do get in touch.  Thank you. Natalie 

Super Chickens – A rather different look at long term team development.

chicks

As one of my New year’s resolutions I have decided that I am going to try to walk to work more often.  The 2 mile stroll will give me time to focus, centre and listen to all the podcasts and TED talks that I’ve not had time to listen to.  This week I came across a great talk by Margaret Heffernan about an experiment by William Muir.

Muir, an eminent Biologist conducted an experiment where he created 2 groups of chickens and watched them for 6 generations, monitoring their egg production and interactions.  One group was left to their own devices and the other group was selectively bred for maximum egg production.  At the end of the experiment the ‘control’ group production had increased over time and the ‘selectively’ bred group had only 3 survivors; the missing having been pecked to death by their comrades in the war for supremacy!

Traditionally this has been quoted by business minds as a lesson in the dangers of high achievers and how a team of highly functioning people can be more destructive than constructive.  In my opinion, I see another lesson here also; the group left to their own devices actually increased their own production over time, surpassing the ‘super’ group – maybe the correct support  could have increased production even more.

This brings me back to teamwork in general and how (as I’ve blogged about previously) that diverse teams, whatever that diversity looks/feels/sounds like are the most successful.

So, should we carefully manage talent, treat it as a destructive force, with no longevity and a quick burnout?  No, talent isn’t a cardboard cut-out, 1 size fits all, it doesn’t come with a flashing neon sign (well not always). Talent comes in a variety of forms and strengths – individual, and team talent are vital for success.  Appropriate leadership and support of all talent (whether inherently visible or yet to shine) is the way forward for all organisations.  Come on let’s not forget on our less obvious talent that is keeping us moving whilst the ‘high achievers’ are pecking each other to death.

hands-1939895.png

Thank you for reading and please do let me know your thoughts. Natalie

Talking HR … I’m interviewed for a US Podcast.

download-1

My career has taken many a turn over the years and my latest opportunity came up after chatting with a Career and Life Coach and a Recruitment Consultant at a birthday party, a few Proseccos and a telephone call later and we were invited to record a pilot podcast for US audiences on a Business Radio Network.  The questions were posed from a layman’s point of view and I was interviewed as the HR specialist, which gave me a certain glow of pride, I don’t mind telling you.

I was expecting an easy time talking through what the HR department does in different organisations and how this influences the direction of the business, strengths, USP etc.  I was very happy however to instead be asked about my predictions for the future and the challenges that HR and employees alike face – something to get my teeth into!

I thought, dear readers, that I’d also share a morsel of the interview  with you to see if you have any thoughts you’d like to add as I’m more than sure that this is in no way a definitive list.

Q1. Is HR changing?

Yes, HR is changing and so it should.  The rate of change in industry should be met with the people support that it needs. HR needs to be as agile and adaptable as the industry it supports.  The onset of the 4th industrial revolution that the Forbes article mentions has been anticipated for a long time.  The replacement of people with AI and global networks of remote workers has been discussed in HR circles before.  Hr needs to not just respond to the current changes of the working environment but also to predict the future needs of the organisation in the industry and markets that it operates in.

I think that HRs are working smarter.  Working together with information at our fingertips, connected via social media and building our networks and knowledge by interacting with HRs at all levels across the world.  HR like specialisms such as marketing is responding quickly to an ever changing world and we’re doing it like good HR professionals should – using our people skills to connect and develop ourselves and each other.

 

Q2. What is your projected view of the immediate future of HR?

I think that HR will very much go in the same direction as industry as a whole, it has to.  I can’t see a time where people are obsolete or completely replaced by AI that can auto match candidates, generate reports, and analyse them etc – what about the human element, personality?  However, I think that the practice of HR will change.  There will be a greater emphasis on managing change and culture, especially with the growth of remote and flexible working patterns.  Also we have to see that with each generation that are building our industries there are differing expectations and requirements.  Baby boomers are less prolific yet still may hold the highest of seats at the board table.  Millennials are the future leaders (and fast climbing current middle leaders) who work in a different way.  They have grown up with internet and global connectivity and a world of work open to them that no other generation had ever seen.

Big data has been a long discussed topic.  What are we collecting?  How are we using this data?  HR are looking to build future proofs into their people strategy but as with everything it is only a projection – that’s why the key to successful future planning for all is agility.  A quick changing model in a superfast changing global market.

I think that there is a drive for creating and supporting resilient teams through a greater emphasis on wellbeing with creative people development offerings for a diverse employee base.

Also I see that performance management will need to change.  The annual performance review is outdated and not in keeping with the idea of building an organisation for the future.  More rounded and constant feedback (360 degrees) will help to create and develop teams as a whole and I see software programmes bringing a large chunk of development planning and mapping to the fore.  People can access MOOCs (Massive open online courses) and structure their personal development better than before.  Development will continue to be an overarching action, not just the addressing of prescribed specific interventions by organisations onto employees.

For me, the cohesion of all of these forward thinking measures is held in the creating and maintaining of a healthy supportive culture within the organisation that underpins everything that you do.

 

This is merely a snapshot of the full discussion and I hope that I will be able to share more details with you as they unfurl.  As always please do comment and share your experiences, thoughts and future predictions.  I wish a Happy and Successful 2017 to you all, Natalie.

*Guest post for Ashley Kate HR*: When coaching and mentoring programmes stagnate; how to reinvigorate the learning culture.

download-3

 

Full article as published on Ashley Kate HR Guest Blog – December 2016

Coaching and mentoring is not a new idea.  Companies large and small run coaching and mentoring programmes whether formally or informally and have done since the practice was first recorded in Ancient Greece.  We know that people learn best using a variety of mediums and that they work best when motivated, engaged and most importantly valued.  Academics and practitioners alike identify that coaching and mentoring help to encourage these.

You had a great idea, you launched a mentoring scheme using senior managers and you trained your line managers to act as coaches to those who report to them.  For a while it all worked well; attrition was down, working relationships were improved and great conversations were taking place regarding long term career planning.  So HR sprung into action, sent out a survey and everyone patted themselves on the back for building another successful intervention to develop people.  

Let’s take a leap a few years into the future….. The magic mentoring programme is failing, matched pairs are not seeing out the full programme and feedback is not good.  Senior manages are not mentoring anymore, middle managers are still coaching their reports but the learning and growing culture that you tried so desperately to reinforce is dwindling.  Why?

A common mistake that I have come across is the belief that training and development budgets can be slashed if ‘we just nail this mentoring and coaching lark’, so schemes are used as a cost-cutting exercise.  I have seen well thought out schemes fall flat on their face because they were thought to be the ‘magic cure all’.  The most extreme of these was in an organisation who believed that they could eliminate all other management training by using Mentoring.  This fell apart rapidly.  Senior management became overwrought with extra responsibility, head count had been reduced and now there was an expectation that they would mentor leaders of the future with no support, at a time when trust in the organisation was at an all time low. The company values were displayed loudly and proudly, but the interventions that they were putting in place were overshadowed by those that they took away.  

How do you rescue a scheme when this happens?

When any organisational incentive stops showing a benefit, it is time to reconsider.  

  • What exactly does this organisation and the people need?  
  • Where is our mentoring talent?  
  • How does mentoring and coaching fit within our existing development offering?  
  • How does this link to our company’s values and goals?
  • How do we embed this learning culture into our organisation?

It may not be your most senior leaders that make up all your leader mentors.   Your middle leaders may be better placed and more knowledgeable about the organisation to make a more positive impact, especially on those at the start of their career.  Most importantly good design and a clear vision of the purpose of the scheme is paramount.  A robust mentoring programme must be:

  1. Focused on the learning and development of the Mentee.
  2. Structured – have goals, a vision of the purpose of the relationship, follow an agreed time structure (even if that is ongoing)
  3. Built on mutual trust – learning means taking risks, sometimes failing.
  4. Considered in matching of mentoring pairs – personality fit and ease of interaction is vital.
  5. Measured on the success of the learning; not all mentoring pairs can be measured against the same markers.
  6. Another example of development that embodies the values of the organisation, not a stand-alone development activity.
  7. Championed as an intrinsic part of leader development with the necessary skills being prerequisites of the Mentors that take part.
  8. Supervised by HR to ensure that the programme remains effective and is valued by the Mentees.  Mentors must be provided with the necessary support and access to learning opportunities to help them be the most effective mentors that they can be.
  9. Made available to all those who would benefit.

To build trust and consequent engagement with the programme an organisation will need to stop, re-think, re-design, re-brand and re-start a mentoring programme.  In order for coaching and mentoring to be a widespread success across an organisation it needs to be a part of the ‘norms’, an activity that all employees can access at different points of their career.  Shouldn’t this fit within the culture of the staffroom as well as the boardroom and be equally valued in both?

Please feel free to comment and let me know of your experiences. Best wishes Natalie.

Intrapreneurs & fostering creative thinking… Big business with start up agility.

Image result for intrapreneur woman

Business moves fast, trends come and go and we are all looking for that magic spell to help us to move with our markets as fast as our competitors.  Agility as individuals, I believe, will be the only way that we can survive in the ever changing workplace going forward but we also have to explore how we can improve business agility for all.  I have long been interested in how large companies diversify and having worked in large corporations and very small businesses alike I have seen first hand how hard this is to call, and have also been there when it was too late and we all packed up and went home.  This made me ponder whether the agility of mind of individuals throughout the hierarchy was the key to the overall agility of the business.

Building a business with 5 one-man-bands

The start-up, agile, pivot if it doesn’t work mentality of the eventually successful entraprenuer seemed a good place to start.  I came across the  ‘intrapreneurialism’ research from the CIPD (below) and was intrigued as to how this could work in practice. They state; ‘Intrapreneurs’ usually work in larger organisations, where they are tasked with developing new ideas and concepts in a similar way that an entrepreneur would in a start-up company’. (What Big Business can learn from Entrepreneurs – CIPD 2013)

The UK’s economic growth could be boosted if large firms adopt the entrepreneurial spirit that drives success in start-ups and small firms, CIPD research has found and by encouraging a culture of ‘intrapreneurialism’, big businesses could help their employees adopt entrepreneurial behaviours that foster innovation and growth, (CIPD).

They also discovered that nearly four in ten employees would welcome the opportunity to take on an intrapreneurial role within their company, but that just 12% of organisations encourage and facilitate such behaviour (CIPD 2013)

Of course the father of ‘Intrapreneurialism’ is Gifford Pinchot who comments that he has seen a resurgence of the intraprenuer in recent years and cites millenials as the most visible group.  Pinchot says that they are searching for meaning in their work from the moment they leave university and want to make a difference.  This isn’t surprising though, after all this is the generation that has lived their whole adult lives with the awesome power of the internet and it’s heroes, Google, Facebook, etc. and are looking to emulate that working life.

Another great attribute that intraprenuers/entrpreneurs are seen to exhibit is adaptive persistence, this allows people in existing organizations to anticipate disruptions to the market and to recognise opportunity (Bloomberg 2008 )

Howard Schultz of Starbucks fame had adaptive persistence.  On Shultz’s travels to Italy he had seen the power of the barista and wanted to bring that coffee shop experience to America.  He presented his idea to Starbucks who rejected it on more than one occasion.  He finally got approval to try it out in a few branches.  He went to raise equity for this and was working without a salary for a while!  His wife was pregnant and although he thought he was ready to give up, he didn’t.  Schultz was able to leverage his network to stave off threats  and stuck with it.  We all know how this plan worked out!

The data appears to stack up that we need diverse teams (Is there an ‘i’ in Team?) and intrapreneurs are diverse thinkers; agile, intelligent and energised.  The key is to know how to attract, select, develop and retain these people.  Clear and strategic programmes to recognise existing intrapreneurs within the business are also vital – to attract and keep out of the box thinkers you need an out of the box programme!

Thank you for reading my initial thoughts on Intraprenuerialism.  Please do like, share and let me know your thoughts. Best Wishes Natalie

 

 

DPIC Interview with Jane Normal

This morning I am meeting with Jane Normal. Jane holds a degree in Business and an Intermediate Diploma from the DPIC. Jane is currently in an active volunteering role as Head of Household Management and manages a team of 3. Here Jane runs us through her amazing career path.
Deirdre “Jane, thank you for agreeing to take the time to talk to DPIC magazine today. Can I start by asking what made you choose your current career path?”
Jane “Well Deirdre, I didn’t always believe that I would have the position that I have now. I got a good degree and spent my early career trying to find a job that excited me, inspired me and challenged me all at once. Rather later than most I stumbled across an area that excited me – HR and I felt that it was a great time to follow the path.”
Deirdre “Why didn’t you continue on this path?”
Jane “I had a family, and although my children were not babies, they needed my help with homework and to collect them from school. I just couldn’t put my dream ahead of their education and happiness. So I thought I’d add to my CV and get a DPIC qualification whilst at home.
I studied for my Intermediate diploma and thoroughly enjoyed every moment of it. I got to work with students from all different industries who were actively pursuing an HR career. I listened to their experiences and gained a new perspective on my own early HR career. I regularly attended DPIC meetings and threw myself into what I thought to be the start of something…. Yet it wasn’t to be. With my DPIC certificate in hand and a spring in my step, I felt validated. It was now confirmed how my knowledge, experience and life skills were valuable and that I could show to potential employers that I was a creditable HR professional.”
Deirdre “What did you do next?”
Jane “ Well Deirdre, I started about writing my CV, adding all the transferrable skills that I had, even managing to put an HR/ L&D spin on childcare and started applying for positions. I can honestly say that nothing prepared me for the 100% rejection rate. There I was, an intelligent, focused, driven, resilient woman with tenacity and common sense abundant, yet to employment agencies I was invisible. On more than one occasion I rang for feedback to ask why I had not been shortlisted and the answer time and time again was that employers wanted someone who had recent and relevant work experience. Relevant! I began to explain how flexible, resilient employees with up to date knowledge and drive should be a valued commodity but was knocked back time and again. Eventually the resilient me admitted defeat.”
Deirdre “So what advice would you give to HRs in today’s job market?”
Jane “I would say to women everywhere that your skills are transferable and if you can apply directly to companies you will have a much better chance at getting to interview. I would add that the job searching via social media offers nothing to me and women like me because of the ‘filters’ that employment agencies use and the sheer volume that they need to sort. I believe that I and other Janes like me should be valued as a highly sought after resource.”
Deirdre “Thank you Jane and I wish you well. Lots to think about there before, during and after starting a family. When is the right time? When you’re young, before a career starts like Jane or later in life when you’re older and more established in your career? That’s all from DPIC magazine this week, look out for our next discussion “Lack of female presence on the board – why?”

Thank you for reading my little ‘tongue in cheek’ piece about our often glossed over highly intelligent yet family focused Jane Normals.  Love to all Janes out there.  Natalie

Being entirely self-taught…

Recently I have been very aware of my love of learning, I say recently as I have always taken it for granted until now.  I love to learn a new skill and feel even better when I get the opportunity to share my new knowledge with someone.  This, I believe stems from my deep rooted fear of the unknown, I like to know why, how, where and when to feel safe in my position.  This fear made me insecure in my youth, but now that I’m a grown up and getting longer in the tooth the joy of teaching myself something new really excites me.

A few clicks through Wikipedia and Google, and I discovered that there are many, many famous and incredibly talented people that are/were entirely self taught. There is…..

Kurt Cobain (taught himself to play the guitar), Edward Elgar (composer), David Bowie (taught himself to play many musical instruments and was a self taught artist), Benjamin Kidd (socialist and author with no formal education at all), Thomas Edison, James Watt, Einstein, Karl Marx.  Heston Blumnethal (UK celebrity chef and avant garde restranteur) lasted less than a week as an apprentice to Raymond Blanc so taught himself haute cuisine.

We are telling our children that they need to be resilient learners and all the information they need is at their fingertips.  We should embrace the flexibility that such autodidactism offers for our own self development.  Taking charge of your own learning and growth should be an inbuilt part of our journey.  I will continue on my autodidactic path, teaching myself to blog and write and I hope that you will bear with me while I polish my MVP and continue on my way.  So get out there, ask questions, read, listen, talk and see how far you can get!  Thank you for reading. Best Wishes Natalie.

I’m no Santa Claus…

Image result for santa claus mike ashley

I have watched with anticipation, slight dismay and disbelief  how Sports Direct got away with paying less than minimum wage.  As it transpires the non payment of employees and temporary staff during the time it took them to clock in and be searched; coupled with the non-payment for their queuing time at the end of their shift to get through security again meant that their actual hours in the building divided by their actual payment for this time resulted in an hourly rate less than that of national minimum wage.  The hearing also brought about the publication (on twitter thanks to @itvjoel https://t.co/OrbcIpjlC4 ) of the ‘6 strikes and you’re out’ policy which uncovered that employees could find themselves receiving a strike for long toilet breaks, wearing branded clothes and being off sick!  

You would be forgiven for throwing the book at the occasionally hapless, confused, deluded and sporadically self-depricating Mike Ashley were it not for the cluelessness of his demeanor – the tycoon offered the investigating panel his helicopter for the day!  In my opinion they were questioning the wrong person if they wished to uncover the extent of cost cutting, labour saving and profit maximising activities at Sports Direct.  To me Mike Ashley came across as the figurehead who had lost all sense of how his business runs.  By no means is this an excuse, he just didn’t grow at the same rate as his creation.  

Mike, in essence appears greedy and he has instilled this in those leaders he surrounds himself with.  I have no doubt that he didn’t ask about HR practices, he doesn’t even mention HR once during his questioning.  He went with a cheap but powerful couple of employment agencies with cost saving implications and without thinking it through and nurtured the Sports Direct culture accordingly.  I read of tannoy announcements made at the warehouse humiliating those workers who appeared not to be pulling their weight, a culture of bullying, and fear that working patterns would be reduced for those who were off sick.  Unite compiled a most damming report with close to the line working practices.

So here begs the question…. Where was HR?  Where were those professionals who were looking to build the company on the strength of its human capital?  Were they asleep?  The most frightening question that I asked myself was…. Were they in on this?  Outsourcing responsibility as well as duty of care.  Outsourcing blame also?   Yet capitalising on the success of the company’s growth.

I am well aware that HR in a retail environment is different.  Staff turnover in all retail is higher than in my industry, the pay is lower and so approaches need to be dissimilar.  That said, the employment of temporary staff on 366 day a year contracts so that they just miss the threshold for cover under the Employment Rights Act does seem a step too far!  I will be watching this story as more unfolds.  My fear is that these types of practice are uncovered as industry norms (as alluded to by Unite in their report) and that this is just a taster of the revelations to come.

Please do let me know your thoughts on this. Thank you as ever for taking the time to read this and please feel free to share!  Best Wishes Natalie.

Lean Down the Mountain… Grow your own Grit!

20160327_115521

Les Arcs, 2016 – I fall down but I get up again!

 

It has been a long time since I tried something new.  I’m not just talking about the new deli filling at the sandwich shop but really trying a completely new activity, with no experience at all, going in totally blind.  Last month I took the plunge and after a long time procrastinating, and a long drive through France to get there I went skiing.  Now for many of you this is no big deal but I am an adult who had never even seen a ski in the flesh or put my foot anywhere near a ski boot, but I really wanted to learn how to ski, I have done since I was a child.

As I strapped my feet into the unforgiving boots and manoeuvred myself over to the nursery slope my heart was in my mouth, my breathing quickened and my ears rang, the adrenaline was pumping hard.  I was certain that I was going to misjudge a curve and shoot off the side of the mountain breaking my legs and ruining the experience for everyone.  I know that I am not good when I feel that I’m not in control of myself!  Lean down the mountain?  I thought they were mad, every bone in my body was telling me not to.

My ski instructor was a burly French lady with a quick wit who saw through my smiling, singing façade.  She took control and through her strength I developed my own.  I fell a lot, and each evening I counted new bruises.  With each passing day I became braver and on the last day I joined my friends (all avid and utterly brilliant skiers) and skied down the mountain without the support of the instructor.

I know that I am still no Chemmy Alcott but I have overcome the barriers that I erected for myself.  I truly believe that this would not have been possible if I had not trusted my instructor when she told me “you will ski!”.  I trusted my guide, believed in myself and stepped out of my comfort zone. 

I am fascinated by how we resist change, we’re mostly afraid and rarely push our boundaries.  Adam Phillips a British Psychoanalyst and Philosopher noted that ,“we think we know more about the experiences that we don’t have, than the experiences we do.  The unlived life becomes more significant and what’s not possible becomes the story of our lives”.  Its true, isn’t it?  We know all about the consequences, the possible pitfalls, and the reasons why we shouldn’t try something; why we shouldn’t make that jump; shouldn’t lean down the mountain.  It goes against all we ‘know’ to be true. 

That’s great, we’re all nervous of change but to grow and develop as people we have to make changes, take the next step.  How do we go from knowing ‘what’s not possible ‘to ‘having a go’?  What does it take?

Grit!  It’s all about having determination and pushing yourself to grow.  Writers on the subject suggest that some people naturally have more grit than others and while that is undoubtedly true, grit is also something that you can learn, cultivate and grow, by changing your mindset, trying new things, being determined and not being afraid to fail and to try again.  Some of the most successful people, such as Richard Branson, Albert Einstein and Marc Zuckerberg all failed.  The failing wasn’t their undoing, it spurred them on to try again and ultimately guaranteed their eventual success.  If you’ve got some time on your hands a worthwhile read on the success of failing comes from Jia Jiang in his book “Rejection Proof”.  Jia, upon quitting his job to become an entrepreneur and failing, set about to devote 6 months to getting rejected every single day.  He made unreasonable requests from everyone, even asking to see the CEO of a company in order to have a staring competition with her, amazingly she agreed to see him!  Jiang noticed that the more he asked for things the better he became at communicating and negotiating.  Needless to say he know commands large audiences as a TED talks speaker and has realised his dream of being a successful entrepreneur.

So, come on, let’s go, let’s lean down the mountain, take the chance, make that step outside our comfort zone, and ask the question.  We may fail, we may be rejected but we will always learn, as Jiang did, and will improve and before we know it we’ll get there!

I’m off now, once more to push my boundaries.  So, I invite you all to share, comment and send this to all of your connections to help me on my grit growing journey – Hey, if you don’t ask…

Good luck, be brave, show grit and determination, and please do post a comment and keep me posted of your progress too!  Thank you for reading.  Natalie

 

 

 

Fluffy Bunnies and Cocktails…

1325112022jet_set_restaurant-ad10

If you could make one change……

It was with a large smile on my face that I read the recent article in People Management magazine ‘Fantasy Workplaces – Free cocktails every Friday’ ( People Management – Feb 2016) Among some of the suggestions for how to improve employee experience were;

  1. A cocktail trolley every Friday.
  2. A large bunny rabbit to cuddle.
  3. Nap rooms.
  4. A boxing ring to solve disputes.

Also within the madness and excitement I saw a variety of actually quite sensible suggestions;

  1. Holding meetings outside to stimulate creativity and fresh ideas.
  2. Limiting meetings to 30 minutes in length
  3. Creating a learning environment for all with art tuition, guitar lessons and a large library and exercise space.

With this in mind I thought I’d reach out to my network of PAYE friends and see what their reactions to this question would be and to be brutally honest I was expecting limited sensible suggestions with an onus on a pay rise and greater flexible working patterns, even with a ‘sack the boss’ thrown in for good measure!

My first friend to reply told me of a company she worked for who provided 10 minute chair massages, once a month for all employees and all expenses paid trips to Barbados for all those who exceeded their targets. Now, we all know that the pre-credit crunch days of hedonism in business are long gone for the majority of us mere mortals. However, I was pleasantly surprised that many more employees buy in to the improvement of their company on a much deeper level – even those who aren’t in HR! We had suggestions of wellbeing options for compulsory training hours (I’ve trialled this and we had great uptake). A meditation and calming room, with pets to cuddle was a fab suggestion beating the problem of leaving your fluffy ones at home all day alone.

This article is a bit of fun but highlights 2 very important things to me:

  1. The carrot approach to increasing productivity really gets people excited.
  2. Employees when aroused by an idea are really creative, forward thinking people who do want to improve not only their work lives but the business that they work in also.

Although we won’t be seeing widespread petting zoos in corporate offices maybe we will see an increase in how leaders see the importance of improving employee experience especially as the spread of technology makes us all contactable 24-7-365.

Please do let me know how your organisation improves employee experience. Are there wellbeing zones and quiet rooms out there? I look forward to hearing some fun suggestions also. Namaste!

Thank you for reading – Natalie