Mentee Success Story!

Incredibly proud of my mentee Anthony. When we first started our journey together he told me that he had been written off by his school as not being suited to A-Levels and was told he should pick a manual trade and follow a less academic pathway.  This wasn’t what he wanted, so he rose above, never letting go of his dream to get a degree. He went to college and only a year behind his peers collected enough UCAS points to apply to university.
Today I am so proud that this man, who was blessed with the gift of a different learning style they broadly label ‘dyslexia’, has graduated with a 1st class honours degree in Business Management and HR!
“Take that!” the teachers that called him lazy! “Take that!” the learning support department that told his parents they would only support him if he was statemented and “Take that!” the Careers Advisor who couldn’t see past the end of her own nose! I am so pleased that Anthony had drive, a non waning ambition and strong supportive parents who wouldn’t take this nonsense, who fought for his education and provided him with the tools and encouragement he did not get at school. Anthony was lucky, there are many young men and girls out there who need this kind of support but can’t access it.
I truly believe that I am so lucky too.  I learned such a lot from Anthony and his Mum, he is a role model for me as a professional, she is a role model for me as a mother and as a person and they are the best kind of role models to my children. I will continue to support Anthony in his search for an HR role and I will be re-registering myself as a volunteer mentor for local young people. Today is a great day!  Congratulations Anthony, you more than deserve this accolade!

*If any of my HR contacts are interested in hearing more about this intelligent, talented and driven young man please do get in touch.  Thank you. Natalie 

Talking HR … I’m interviewed for a US Podcast.

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My career has taken many a turn over the years and my latest opportunity came up after chatting with a Career and Life Coach and a Recruitment Consultant at a birthday party, a few Proseccos and a telephone call later and we were invited to record a pilot podcast for US audiences on a Business Radio Network.  The questions were posed from a layman’s point of view and I was interviewed as the HR specialist, which gave me a certain glow of pride, I don’t mind telling you.

I was expecting an easy time talking through what the HR department does in different organisations and how this influences the direction of the business, strengths, USP etc.  I was very happy however to instead be asked about my predictions for the future and the challenges that HR and employees alike face – something to get my teeth into!

I thought, dear readers, that I’d also share a morsel of the interview  with you to see if you have any thoughts you’d like to add as I’m more than sure that this is in no way a definitive list.

Q1. Is HR changing?

Yes, HR is changing and so it should.  The rate of change in industry should be met with the people support that it needs. HR needs to be as agile and adaptable as the industry it supports.  The onset of the 4th industrial revolution that the Forbes article mentions has been anticipated for a long time.  The replacement of people with AI and global networks of remote workers has been discussed in HR circles before.  Hr needs to not just respond to the current changes of the working environment but also to predict the future needs of the organisation in the industry and markets that it operates in.

I think that HRs are working smarter.  Working together with information at our fingertips, connected via social media and building our networks and knowledge by interacting with HRs at all levels across the world.  HR like specialisms such as marketing is responding quickly to an ever changing world and we’re doing it like good HR professionals should – using our people skills to connect and develop ourselves and each other.

 

Q2. What is your projected view of the immediate future of HR?

I think that HR will very much go in the same direction as industry as a whole, it has to.  I can’t see a time where people are obsolete or completely replaced by AI that can auto match candidates, generate reports, and analyse them etc – what about the human element, personality?  However, I think that the practice of HR will change.  There will be a greater emphasis on managing change and culture, especially with the growth of remote and flexible working patterns.  Also we have to see that with each generation that are building our industries there are differing expectations and requirements.  Baby boomers are less prolific yet still may hold the highest of seats at the board table.  Millennials are the future leaders (and fast climbing current middle leaders) who work in a different way.  They have grown up with internet and global connectivity and a world of work open to them that no other generation had ever seen.

Big data has been a long discussed topic.  What are we collecting?  How are we using this data?  HR are looking to build future proofs into their people strategy but as with everything it is only a projection – that’s why the key to successful future planning for all is agility.  A quick changing model in a superfast changing global market.

I think that there is a drive for creating and supporting resilient teams through a greater emphasis on wellbeing with creative people development offerings for a diverse employee base.

Also I see that performance management will need to change.  The annual performance review is outdated and not in keeping with the idea of building an organisation for the future.  More rounded and constant feedback (360 degrees) will help to create and develop teams as a whole and I see software programmes bringing a large chunk of development planning and mapping to the fore.  People can access MOOCs (Massive open online courses) and structure their personal development better than before.  Development will continue to be an overarching action, not just the addressing of prescribed specific interventions by organisations onto employees.

For me, the cohesion of all of these forward thinking measures is held in the creating and maintaining of a healthy supportive culture within the organisation that underpins everything that you do.

 

This is merely a snapshot of the full discussion and I hope that I will be able to share more details with you as they unfurl.  As always please do comment and share your experiences, thoughts and future predictions.  I wish a Happy and Successful 2017 to you all, Natalie.

DPIC Interview with Jane Normal

This morning I am meeting with Jane Normal. Jane holds a degree in Business and an Intermediate Diploma from the DPIC. Jane is currently in an active volunteering role as Head of Household Management and manages a team of 3. Here Jane runs us through her amazing career path.
Deirdre “Jane, thank you for agreeing to take the time to talk to DPIC magazine today. Can I start by asking what made you choose your current career path?”
Jane “Well Deirdre, I didn’t always believe that I would have the position that I have now. I got a good degree and spent my early career trying to find a job that excited me, inspired me and challenged me all at once. Rather later than most I stumbled across an area that excited me – HR and I felt that it was a great time to follow the path.”
Deirdre “Why didn’t you continue on this path?”
Jane “I had a family, and although my children were not babies, they needed my help with homework and to collect them from school. I just couldn’t put my dream ahead of their education and happiness. So I thought I’d add to my CV and get a DPIC qualification whilst at home.
I studied for my Intermediate diploma and thoroughly enjoyed every moment of it. I got to work with students from all different industries who were actively pursuing an HR career. I listened to their experiences and gained a new perspective on my own early HR career. I regularly attended DPIC meetings and threw myself into what I thought to be the start of something…. Yet it wasn’t to be. With my DPIC certificate in hand and a spring in my step, I felt validated. It was now confirmed how my knowledge, experience and life skills were valuable and that I could show to potential employers that I was a creditable HR professional.”
Deirdre “What did you do next?”
Jane “ Well Deirdre, I started about writing my CV, adding all the transferrable skills that I had, even managing to put an HR/ L&D spin on childcare and started applying for positions. I can honestly say that nothing prepared me for the 100% rejection rate. There I was, an intelligent, focused, driven, resilient woman with tenacity and common sense abundant, yet to employment agencies I was invisible. On more than one occasion I rang for feedback to ask why I had not been shortlisted and the answer time and time again was that employers wanted someone who had recent and relevant work experience. Relevant! I began to explain how flexible, resilient employees with up to date knowledge and drive should be a valued commodity but was knocked back time and again. Eventually the resilient me admitted defeat.”
Deirdre “So what advice would you give to HRs in today’s job market?”
Jane “I would say to women everywhere that your skills are transferable and if you can apply directly to companies you will have a much better chance at getting to interview. I would add that the job searching via social media offers nothing to me and women like me because of the ‘filters’ that employment agencies use and the sheer volume that they need to sort. I believe that I and other Janes like me should be valued as a highly sought after resource.”
Deirdre “Thank you Jane and I wish you well. Lots to think about there before, during and after starting a family. When is the right time? When you’re young, before a career starts like Jane or later in life when you’re older and more established in your career? That’s all from DPIC magazine this week, look out for our next discussion “Lack of female presence on the board – why?”

Thank you for reading my little ‘tongue in cheek’ piece about our often glossed over highly intelligent yet family focused Jane Normals.  Love to all Janes out there.  Natalie